AGED CARE COMMITMENT WON’T FIX ISSUES CAUSED BY COALITION

Too little, too late.

More than 30,000 locals in the electorate of Whitlam are aged over 65 (almost 20 percent of the total population) and around 3,500 are aged over 85.  In Cunningham, almost 27,000 people are over the age of 65 (over 17 per cent) and around 4,208 are aged over 85.

There are more than 1000 people in the Illawarra and 614 in the Southern Highlands who are in the National Prioritisation Queue for home care packages. These people have been placed in the queue based on their individual needs and circumstances.

After ripping almost $2 billion out of the aged care system as Treasurer, Scott Morrison aimed to cover his tracks the day before a Royal Commission into the sector by announcing  10,000 home care packages.

10,000 packages barely make a dent in the list of those in need.

The waiting list for home care packages blew out to more than 108,000 when Morrison was treasurer.

In his last budget he did not deliver one new dollar of funding to aged care.

The waiting list includes 88,000 older Australians with high needs, many with dementia.

You cannot rip almost $2 billion out of an aged care system and not have an impact on quality and waiting lists, and a late election commitment does not erase years of neglect from an increasingly chaotic government.

Under this Coalition Government, the standard of aged care has been in free fall.

Older locals and their families cannot wait until the end of the Royal Commission, for the known issues is to be fixed.